RJ Trainings

Restorative Practices (RP) are a set of diverse ideas and approaches used to build healthy communities, improve school climate, repair harm and restore relationships. These practices - Affective Statements, Restorative Questions, Proactive Circles, Reactive Circles, and Restorative Conferencing - range from whole school strategies to specific intervention techniques. Our Fall 2019 trainings focus on Proactive Circles (Establishing a Circle Practice in the Classroom) and Restorative Conferencing. 

Establishing a Circle Practice in the Classroom

Wednesday, March 11, 2020 
8:30 am - 3:30 pm
Bismarck Public Schools Career Academy 

Room 217, Bismarck

Tuesday, June 2

8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Grand Forks

 

Monday, June 8

8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Fargo

Restorative Conferencing Facilitator Training

Thursday, March 12 and Friday, March 13, 2020 
8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Bismarck Public Schools Career Academy

Room 217, Bismarck

Wednesday, June 3 and Thursday, June 4

8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Grand Forks

Restorative Interventions for Responding to Student Conflicts and Bullying

Tuesday, June 9 through Thursday, June 11

8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Fargo

REGISTRATION POSTPONED

Establishing a Circle Practice in the Classroom

 

The Circle is a simple yet carefully constructed communication process that helps foster a caring and respectful classroom culture.  The practice of circles is a powerful tool to build empathy, emotional literacy, self-regulation, and self-awareness skills.  Participants will learn and practice the 8 essential elements of the circle.  Applicable for elementary, middle and high school age students. 

Restorative Conferencing Facilitator Training

 

The practice of restorative conferencing is an intervention that can be used for rule violations or other harms. Restorative practices can be an option to consider in multi-tiered levels of support, or used in conjunction with the school's discipline policy, such as suspension, detention, referral to student support staff or as part of an individual education program. A restorative practice to repair harm has three parts—pre-meetings to prepare all participants for the meeting, the face to face meeting that results in an agreement reached by consensus, and an agreement completion meeting to assess and celebrate. In making the agreement, participants consider four main elements: a) repairing harm, b) making a plan so that the behavior does not happen again, c) giving back to the school community and d) support for the person harmed, the person who did the harm, or any other affected person.

Testimonials

“Wonderful training & trainers. I can’t wait to try this out to help resolve conflicts.”

“This was so beneficial. I wish it lasted longer!”

“It really changed my thinking of how to talk & listen to students.”

“I thoroughly enjoyed this training & found it to be extremely useful.”

“This was one of the best trainings I have ever attended.  All of the information was relevant and able to be applied to a variety of situations.”